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Showing posts tagged Biology

jtotheizzoe:

genannetics:

A Beautiful time-lapse of HeLa Cell Division
This simple, gorgeous image of a HeLa cell (the cancer cell line commonly used for cell biology) undergoing mitosis is my favorite photograph from the 2012 Wellcome Image Awards.  Imagine, every cell that make up you and I undergo the same process.  

This composite confocal micrograph uses time-lapse microscopy to show a cancer cell (HeLa) undergoing cell division (mitosis). The DNA is shown in red, and the cell membrane is shown in cyan. The round cell in the centre has a diameter of 20 microns.
By Kuan-Chung Su and Mark Petronczki, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK


Just think: you began as two half-cells that became one, which then divided just like this, next to perfectly every time, until there were ~10 trillion cells in your body. Mighty mitosis.

jtotheizzoe:

genannetics:

A Beautiful time-lapse of HeLa Cell Division

This simple, gorgeous image of a HeLa cell (the cancer cell line commonly used for cell biology) undergoing mitosis is my favorite photograph from the 2012 Wellcome Image Awards.  Imagine, every cell that make up you and I undergo the same process.  

This composite confocal micrograph uses time-lapse microscopy to show a cancer cell (HeLa) undergoing cell division (mitosis). The DNA is shown in red, and the cell membrane is shown in cyan. The round cell in the centre has a diameter of 20 microns.

By Kuan-Chung Su and Mark Petronczki, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK

Just think: you began as two half-cells that became one, which then divided just like this, next to perfectly every time, until there were ~10 trillion cells in your body. Mighty mitosis.

639 notes

Posted at 12:27am
Reblogged (Photo reblogged from jtotheizzoe)
Tagged Mitosis HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells Biology Science

 


The cupboard of a biologist.

The cupboard of a biologist.

1,567 notes

Posted at 5:53pm
Reblogged (Photo reblogged from wilder-flowers)
Tagged Biology Science Illistration Art

 


Cortisol

Cortisol, synthesized from cholesterol, is a hormone produced in the adrenal gland in response to stress.  Its primary functions are to increase blood sugar, suppress the immune system, and aid in fat, protein and carbohydrate metabolism.

Cortisol works with epinephrine (adrenaline) to create memories of short-term emotional events; this is the proposed mechanism for storage of flash bulb memories, and may originate as a means to remember what to avoid in the future. However, long-term exposure to cortisol damages cells in the hippocampus; this damage results in impaired learning. Furthermore, it has been shown that cortisol inhibits memory retrieval of already stored information.

In addition, cortisol has anti-inflammatory properties, reducing histamine secretion and stabilizing lysosomal membranes. Stabilization of lysosomal membranes prevents their rupture, preventing damage to healthy tissues.

Factors Which Can Reduce Cortisol Levels

  • laughing
  • sexual intercourse
  • black tea
  • crying:  William H. Frey II, a biochemist at the University of Minnesota, proposed that people feel “better” after crying, due to the elimination of hormones associated with stress, specifically adrenocorticotropic hormone. This, paired with increased mucosal secretion during crying, could lead to a theory that crying is a mechanism developed in humans to dispose of this stress hormone when levels grow too high.

Factors Which Can Increase Cortisol Levels

  • caffeine
  • sleep deprivation
  • anorexia nervosa

Many high-stress lifestyels cause people to live in constant upregulation of cortisol. Because cortisol suppresses the immune system, it can keep one from becoming sick during the stressful period. However, once the work load goes back to normal, the immune system will return to full speed and cause symptoms of sickness to occur. In people with extremely stressful jobs, such as business CEO’s and military generals, a sudden retirement can create a drastic change in cortisol levels the immune system, and can cause them to become fatally ill.

3 notes

Posted at 2:36pm
Tagged Cortisol Chemistry Biology Science

 


aamukherjee:

expose-the-light:

Ingredients of life

Illustrations of Chemical compounds by Rex

An ultra-cool set of posters! Dopamine is the one I am most familiar with and it’s a very interesting chemical not only because it causes our emotional responses, but because it controls the ‘reward system’ of our brain which in turn motivates us to repeat actions that we enjoy (even if they are not good for our overall health, as is the case with chemical addiction).

But rather than dwelling too much on the more serious effects of these chemical responses, focus more on the greatness of the posters!

88,177 notes

Posted at 12:14pm
Reblogged (Photoset reblogged from everyoneswrongbutme-deactivated)
Tagged Molecules Science Human Biology

 


Not a single one of the cells that compose you knows who you are, or cares.
770 notes

Posted at 3:46am
Reblogged (Quote reblogged from scienceisbeauty)
Tagged Cells Biology Science

 


ohscience:

Eosin stained sea urchin sperm. Head and mid-piece appear orange; tail propels the sperm (500x)

D’awww.

ohscience:

Eosin stained sea urchin sperm. Head and mid-piece appear orange; tail propels the sperm (500x)

D’awww.

83 notes

Posted at 9:02pm
Reblogged (Photo reblogged from ohscience)
Tagged science biology sea urchin ocean sperm

 


cwnl:

Iris Dysgenesis
Here, the iris is malformed by a rare genetic condition. Normally, the eye develops from two optic vesicles, which pop out of either side of the forebrain. As the optic vesicles grow they reach the face, eventually forming the lens of the eye. Problems can arise at any time in this process, mainly through rare and unidentified genetic defects.
Image: Chris Barry

cwnl:

Iris Dysgenesis

Here, the iris is malformed by a rare genetic condition. Normally, the eye develops from two optic vesicles, which pop out of either side of the forebrain. As the optic vesicles grow they reach the face, eventually forming the lens of the eye. Problems can arise at any time in this process, mainly through rare and unidentified genetic defects.

Image: Chris Barry

414 notes

Posted at 9:36am
Reblogged (Photo reblogged from afro-dominicano)
Tagged Science Biology Iris Optic

 


ohscience:

crustacean larva

God this is too adorable.

84 notes

Posted at 9:52pm
Reblogged (Photo reblogged from ohscience)
Tagged crustacean larva biology animals science

 


ohscience:

water droplet containing two mosquito larvae

You guys are cool.  For now.
But once you hatch I’m Deet’ing your asses to mosquito hell. 

629 notes

Posted at 12:58am
Reblogged (Photo reblogged from ohscience)
Tagged science biology mosquito larva larvae animals

 


ohscience:


hippocampal neurons

OH MY GOD THEY’RE SO CUTE

ohscience:

hippocampal neurons

OH MY GOD THEY’RE SO CUTE

378 notes

Posted at 2:52am
Reblogged (Photo reblogged from ohscience)
Tagged gif science biology neurons neuron brain cell cells hippocampus

 


ohscience:

Phytoplankton produce more oxygen than all other plant life combined. 

593 notes

Posted at 9:42pm
Reblogged (Photo reblogged from ohscience)
Tagged science biology plant algae phytoplankton plankton

 


ohscience:

All clownfish are born male. When they become adults, the largest, most dominant fish becomes a female, and the second largest becomes the breeding male. If the breeding female disappears, the breeding male (now the largest of the group) will become a female, and so on. In other species of tropical fish, when the ratio between males and females becomes imbalanced, dominant females may become males. 

I kind of want a clownfish now.

918 notes

Posted at 6:42pm
Reblogged (Photo reblogged from ohscience)
Tagged science biology animals fish tropical fish ocean clownfish sex gender trans transfish?

 


ohscience:

Echinaster brasiliensis (starfish) embryo, four cell stage (60X)

234 notes

Posted at 6:07pm
Reblogged (Photo reblogged from 7minutesofterror)
Tagged science biology animals cells echinaster brasiliensis starfish embryo

 


jtotheizzoe:

scipsy:

Structure of HIV

HIV: Essentially a pint glass full of gummi worms inside of a basketball that has been used for dart practice! -J

^^^ I’m dying xD

jtotheizzoe:

scipsy:

Structure of HIV

HIV: Essentially a pint glass full of gummi worms inside of a basketball that has been used for dart practice! -J

^^^ I’m dying xD

150 notes

Posted at 5:55pm
Reblogged (Photo reblogged from jtotheizzoe)
Tagged hiv virus medicine biology science

 


jtotheizzoe:

Wired has a nice slideshow of several design tricks that we borrowed from Mother Nature. Or as we call it in the biz, biomimicry.

Above: Shark skin naturally repels bacteria and barnacles because of its particular structure (little points called “denticles”). A company called Sharklet Technologies used it as the design behind their antibacterial coating for medical devices seen in the second picture.

Images: 1) AskNature.org. 2) Sharkskin closeup/Sharklet Technologies.

It’d be even cooler to put little denticles on everyday surfaces.  Dirty places like desks at school, keyboards, kitchen counters, or even countertops in a lab.  I look forward to more research by Sharklet and making this technology more widespread.

(And as an aside, AskNature.org is run by the folks in town at the Biomimicry Institute.  I’m happy it’s recognized and used by so many :’]  AskNature is also partially sponsored by Autodesk, that 3D design software you learn to use in Drafting class.  Engineers and scientists working together.  Ah, I smell harmony in the world.)

59 notes

Posted at 11:20am
Reblogged (Photoset reblogged from jtotheizzoe)
Tagged science sharks biology design biomimicry

 




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